The Common logo


Common logo

The Common Logo represents……..

The serpent eating its own tail represents connectivity. It is the Ouroboros snake a symbol that relates to cyclical and infinite nature. The point at which the tail (past) meets the mouth (future) and creates the present and shows how one leads into the other. It represents how  we are all connected to each other and our wider environment, the universe, and are on an eternal loop of death and rebirth.

The nurturing hand is a glyph called child of the mother. It represents family, another inescapable force of nature. We are all the child of the mother, not only on the level of our own mother but connected to mother earth. As such this symbol is universal and is a symbol that stands for every single human on the planet and beyond.

The bull’s head is a symbol of respect to the farm environment and the big man… Michael Eavis.

The bird’s head is the head of the roadrunner and this represents travel. The majority of the core team who create The Common come from living on the road in collective groups, and from creating & holding spaces for large groups of people to connect, create, express, and unite, all across the globe, from India, to Australia, to Bosnia and beyond.
The most important and central to our entire existence is music.

The guy with headphones on represents, not someone on a solo trip as a DJ or listening to personal stereo but as a listener, representing all listeners, completely immersed in the sound of the universe.

The fangs at the top protect us from the corrosive effects of inertia. They point upward ready to bite the head of our enemies and forces that would conspire to stop us.

The broken piece is the missing link, which is the unexpected emergent quality that appears as a byproduct of the above elements working together, it has an indescribable nature, which is the result of the collective dance working with the participants to create a feedback loop packed with cosmic energy, designed to blow the walls off, but expected to do far more.

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