Greenpeace 2016


Activists hang under the St. Johns Bridge in an attempt to block the Shell leased icebreaker, MSV Fennica from passing under the bridge and joining Shell's Arctic drilling fleet. According to the latest federal permit, the Fennica must be at Shell’s drill site before Shell can reapply for federal approval to drill deep enough for oil in the Chukchi Sea. People vs Shell, the climbers, are currently preventing the ship from passing underneath the bridge on its way to meet Shell’s drilling fleet. The climbers have enough supplies to last for several days.

Activists hang under the St. Johns Bridge in an attempt to block the Shell leased icebreaker, MSV Fennica from passing under the bridge and joining Shell’s Arctic drilling fleet. According to the latest federal permit, the Fennica must be at Shell’s drill site before Shell can reapply for federal approval to drill deep enough for oil in the Chukchi Sea. People vs Shell, the climbers, are currently preventing the ship from passing underneath the bridge on its way to meet Shell’s drilling fleet. The climbers have enough supplies to last for several days.

Let’s set out on a journey of hope, not folly, and shine a light on the solutions that can lead us to a cleaner, greener world.

Since we all last met and pulled on our wellies, a lot has happened. A landmark climate deal was reached in Paris (signed by 195 countries no less). Shell finally buckled under the pressure of seven million voices and abandoned its plans to carve up the Arctic looking for oil. And the shocking state of London’s air quality was plonked firmly at the top of the political agenda through some bread and butter Greenpeace direct action on some of the capital’s most iconic statues.

Undoubtedly these are impressive and significant developments. But we have all been around long enough to know there is a long way to go. The climate deal was better than anyone expected, yet still less than what was needed. And while Shell’s sharp exit stage left from the chilly north is a defeat of which we should all be proud, the Arctic is far from free of threat. Yet the global political mood is shifting. Big oil is on the run and it is as obvious now as it has ever been that a 100% renewable future is within reach – we just need to grab it.

The British government may seem intent on squeezing the renewable industry with every chance it can get, but there is no denying the fact that solar and wind energy have come of age and this year at the Greenpeace field we are demonstrating both what that means for all of us now… and in the future.

We want to show just how we can preserve life as we know it by switching to low carbon technologies and by re-greening our cities. And those technologies exist. Exciting developments like the solar farms of Southern Europe; European wind farms; tidal lagoons; powered storage; and electric transport.

We will provide a representation of a European super-grid decoupled from a high carbon future. We want people to leave our field feeling inspired. And if you are thinking that this all sounds like a zone for science boffins only  – you can be sure that this will all be delivered with the trademark Greenpeace fun and features as well as a lot of good tunes and a lot of good times.

Ending the age of oil and letting nature itself back into our towns and cities by being smarter in the way we produce, use and distribute our energy, ought to be a no brainer. So let’s celebrate that we have the technology at our disposal right now. Let’s set out on a journey of hope not folly and shine a light on the solutions that can lead us to a cleaner, greener world.

To find out more about Greenpeace UK click here.

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